Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington, d.c. he cannot give in words his powerpoint if he mentions sequestration oncetor committee as a whole or the motion to recommit eyes will glaze over he's got to stay on offense but at the same time he has to par tri differences between him and governor romney and especially changes that governor romney -- several incarnations that have gone to is going to parry that, not to get into the weeds but parry it. as far as joe biden, i think he's got a tougher but in many ways more simple. he's got to lift the spirits of the spirited -- dispirited democrats. i think he f he does that -- he is the happy warrior, very much so. a lot more so than the president. but he these play both offense and defense. last week the president played neither. by defense he's got to be able to say "this is what we've accomplished." and point out especially in states like ohio and michigan the difference the auto industry has made student loans being -- the interest being removed. the pre-existing condition. all of those things, he's got to do it. and at the same time he's got to go on offense as far
of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political rallies. sounds like a much better assignment. [laughter] she appears on the takeaway and contributed to npr, bbc, wgvh, new york 1 and pbs. next to her is greg marx who's a staff writer for the columbia journalism review, co-editor of cjr's swing state project. he was a writer for remapping, and if you've seen his writings, which i have fold over the last few week -- followed over the last few weeks, he's doing some the most interesting commentary on how the campaign is being conducted. and then finally, my old colleague at newsday, ellis henican all the way on the left there -- appropriately. [laughter] a po
this powerpoint presentation. but i would like to turn to my colleagues for discussion about what all this means and where are we today now two weeks out from november 6. let me start with, both of you, the latino vote, we talked about it being decisive and impactful. we are now two weeks out and both campaigns have been engaging efforts to reach latinos particularly in targeted states and the race is tightening. let's talk first about florida because that is one state that has been pivotal in the past three presidential election cycles where the hispanic vote has made the difference. ana in your state how are things looking state-wide? >> they're looking a little different than they were four years ago. before we start talking about florida, you said we had to hispanics running for u.s. senate and we can't forget bob menendez. that makes it three or as i call him my democratic -- so he is also in the race and we hope he wins in new jersey. florida, florida has become more diverse within the hispanic community. we have seen an increasing number of colombians become citizens and become active pol
to question and answer pretty quickly. thank you. >> i have a powerpoint. can you see the screen? okay. that's great. thank you for the kind introduction, and i am honored to speak to you today. i recall that i was here twice over the past ten years. once was on the eve of the 16th, the other five years ago on the eve of the 17th. each time i learn a great deal on the chinese leadership and rebalanced, you know, the exchange of ideas and colleagues at the heritage foundation. now, in my ten to 15 minute presentation that does not work -- okay. for some reason it's very, very slow. yeah, i will address three basic questions. first, who are the main candidates or competitors for the new standing committee and what is the likely composition and to the balance of power? certainly who are the main competitors for the new commission military leadership? what are the major issues regarding this change in military leadership? and finally, i will talk about how the upcoming generation of the top ministry officers affect the relationships and interactions with the civilian counterparts. now the first
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)